MOON KNIGHT: MONSTERS, AND MADNESS #1

15/10/2019 – By Sam Watson-Tayler

PAGE ONE

Panel 1: Establishing shot of Spector Manor. It’s a dark night, the rain is intense, and the trees are straining against the wind. There are no lights on.

Panel 2: We see the gutters running around the roof, they are heavily overflowing with rain. An owl flies over the crescent moon, a watcher over the protector of midnight travellers.

Panel 3: Marc Spector lies with the right side of his head against his pillow, the light of the moon and the lights on the road illuminating the middle of his face from between his slightly open curtains.

Panel 4: Marc’s eyes flutter open at the sound of the voice of his god.

  1. KHONSHU (from off-panel): Wake up, my child. There is work to be done under my light

PAGE TWO

Panel 1: Marc turns and sees Khonshu holding a cup of tea, despite having a bird skull for a head, sitting with his legs crossed in a chair next to Marc’s bed. On Marc’s bedside table we see several medicine bottles with the name SPECTOR, MARC on them and a glass of water.

Panel 2: We see a bird’s eye view of Marc’s hand reaching for his medication bottles.

Panel 3: The same shot, but Khonshu’s hand stops Marc’s.

Panel 4: Marc is sitting up; his brows are furrowed, and he has a scared frown on his face. We see out of the window behind him and there is nothing of note.

  1. KHONSHU (from off-panel): There are monsters here. They have come to destroy this world as they always do. The Avengers, the sorcerers, do not expect them to help.

PAGE THREE

Panel 1: Marc looks over to the walk-in closet.

  1. KHONSHU (from off-panel): There is only one who can push them back.

Panel 2: Marc walks towards the closet, reaching for it.

  1. KHONESU (from off-panel): My knight of vengeance.

Panel 3: We see Marc from behind as he opens the closet. We see the various Moon Knight outfits from over the years.

  1. KHONSHU (from off-panel): My greatest warrior.

PAGES FOUR AND FIVE

Two-page spread of Marc in full Moon Knight supernatural armour, as he pulls the bird skull mask on. He has an enchanted sword at his left hip.

  1. KHONSHU (from off-panel): The Moon Knight.

PAGE SIX

Panel 1: Moon Knight turns toward the window and through it we see a humanoid monster, with five octopi as a head and the heads of several massive predatory animals making up most of the rest of its body, things like crocodiles, tigers, lions, sharks, etc.. Moon Knight is about the size of a sparrow compared to the beast.

Panel 2: We see the mansion from the outside and from the right. Moon Knight smashes through the window shoulder-first like an American football player. The many mouths that make up the monster are open; it wishes to devourer Moon Knight.

Panel 3: Moon Knight punches the monster full strength in one of its faces.

PAGE SEVEN

Panel 1: Moon Knight lands on his feet, his knees almost buckling from the landing.

Panel 2: Worm’s eye view of the monster as it looks down at Moon Knight, black tar like goo drools form its mouth as its infinitely dark, empty sets of eyes all focus on Moon Knight.

Panel 3: Bird’s eye view of Moon Knight as he looks up at the monster and gives it the finger with his right hand, while his left holds the sword’s sheath.

Panel 4: We see the scene from the left as Moon Knight jumps towards the reader, just narrowly avoiding the monster’s massive foot coming down where he was standing. Despite the size and presumed weight of the beast no damage is done to the grass. Moon Knight is drawing the sword with his right hand as he jumps.

Panel 5: Bird’s eye view of Moon Knight with his sword drawn jumping towards the drooling, screaming heads of monsters and predators. The sword glows hauntingly white, a cloud of energy surrounding it, appearing to be smoke, as it rises it turns into furious skulls. Moon Knight is fearless, either through bravery, stupidity, or an innate suspicion of everything his mind shows him.

Panel 6: With one slash Moon Knight takes off three of the hundreds of heads that make up the monster’s leg.

PAGE EIGHT

Panel 1: The creature reaches down, enraged, and hungry reaches down towards Moon Knight, fully intent on killing and devouring him.

Panel 2: Moon Knight is taken in the creature’s fist, the many mouths biting into him, yet not drawing blood.

Panel 3: Moon Knight retaliates by forcing his sword into a wolf head that’s biting him, black blood going everywhere, all over his white superhero suit.

PAGE NINE

Panel 1: The monster, in pain, lets go of Moon Knight and he jumps towards its head.

Panel 2: We look at Moon Knight from over the monster’s shoulder as he comes down towards it, his sword held high the blade going downwards towards it face.

Panel 3: Moon Knight plunges the sword deep into his eye, the reader can barely tell where the eye ends and the black thick blood begins. It covers even more of the Moon Knight suit.

Panel 4: Moon Knight puts his feet against one of the monster’s five squid faces that make up its head.

Panel 5: Moon Knight jumps away from the monster as the energy around the blade extends it to be several times longer than Moon Knight’s own height.

PAGE TEN

Full page spread of Moon Knight decapitating the monster with one slash.

PAGE ELEVEN

Panel 1: We see Moon Knight from behind as he lands on his feet once again, the monster falls to its knees in the background as its black blood mixes with the actual rain, coming down on Moon Knight.

Panel 2: As the mixed rain continues as Moon Knight sheathes his sword.

Panel 3: Point of view shot as Moon Knight looks at his own black, blood-soaked palms.

Panel 4: Point of view shot of Moon Knight’s hands now balled into fists.

PAGE TWELVE

Panel 1: We see Moon Knight from side on from the waist up, this continues for each panel on this page as he walks back into his mansion.

Panel 2: Moon Knight walks through the kitchen.

Panel 3: Moon Knight climbs the stairs.

Panel 4: Moon Knight opens the bedroom door.

PAGE THIRTEEN
Panel 1:
Moon Knight takes off all the armour.

Panel 2: Marc Spector, now wearing only his underwear, walks over to his bedside table, the chair where Khnoshu earlier sat is now empty.

Panel 3: Marc grabs one of the bottles with his name on it with his right hand.

PAGE FOURTEEN

Panel 1: Point of view shot of Marc opening the bottle with his left hand.

Panel 2: Point of view shot of Marc shaking two of the pills out of the bottle into his left hand.

Panel 3: Close up of marc throwing the pills into his mouth.

Panel 4: Close up of Marc taking a sip of water.

Panel 5: Marc collapses to his bed.

PAGE FOURTEEN

Panel 1: Bird’s eye view of Marc as he wakes up the next morning.

Panel 2: Marc sits up, running his hands over his face.

Panel 3: Marc walks over to what’s left of his window.

Panel 4: We see out through the hole where the window used to be and see no sight of the monster, just nice unharmed grass and not a drop of blood to be seen.

Panel 5: We see the Moon Knight armor on the floor, completely immaculately clean. No damage, no blood, nothing.

Panel 6: Marc runs his hand through his hair in anger and concern as he realizes what may well have really happened.

Marc: Goddammit.

 

Exegesis.

 

 

I waffled a lot on what I was going to do for this project and I did come up with some fairly good ideas, but eventually, I decided that I would be able to come up with the best work I could do with a script. Initially I wanted to do a combination of Moon Knight and Lovecraftian horror, but eventually, that somewhat gave way to what I eventually did do. More on that later.

While I had, at first, considered doing a collective journey, I concluded that there just wasn’t enough space in the word count for that. See when you have a focus on more than one character you need more words in order to give them a satisfactory degree of attention. As such, I decided to go for the hero’s journey with a very minimal number of characters. Moon Knight, Khonshu and a monster to fight, because you need one.

With regards to the hero’s journey, in this case, I shook up the order of events just a tad, and far from used all of them. But the ones I used I feel are some of the most important, especially in a shorter story.

The call to adventure and meeting the mentor: Because that Marc already knows Khonshu, saying “meeting the mentor” is a little bit inaccurate, but I think it counts given that Khonshu is there to tell him what to do and in this case tells him to slay the beast.

Refusing the call: Marc, suspicious of what he’s saying due to his mental health issues in the comics, reaches for his medication, but Khonshu stops him from taking it.

Crossing the threshold: Marc decides to accept what he’s being told and suits up to fight the monster.

Ordeal: There are two in place here, the physical battle against the monster and potentially the mental battle against Marc’s own mental illnesses, hence the implication that all of this was hallucinatory in nature.

The road back: Upon returning to bed and throwing his armour off, Marc does have a degree of satisfaction, but he is still suspicious, hence the choice to take the medication at the end.

Return with the elixir: Marc is rewarded with taking his medicine and getting back to sleep. However, upon awakening and finding every trace of the previous night’s ordeal gone, he is given the knowledge that his suspicions may well have been right and degree of both vindication and concern (Bronzite, n.d.).

Much like with Lovecraft, Moon Knight deals in both interdimensional gods and mental health. Compare for a moments Dagon to Moon Knight (2016). The protagonist of Dagon himself openly wondering if the story he is recounting is even true, or if he has simply succumbed to madness and in Moon Knight (2016) Marc Spector does the same, ultimately being told by Khonshu to trust his own madness and let it guide him (Lemire, 2016) (Lovecraft, 1919). Warren Ellis’ take on Moon Knight even raising the question of if Marc Spector’s dissociative identity disorder is even real and posing the possibility that Khonshu’s inhuman consciousness inhabiting his brain caused brain damage and Marc’s multiple personalities are as a result of his mind trying desperately to accommodate it (Ellis, 2014).

Hence my choice to question the existence of what Marc is fighting, it wasn’t just a dream, he really did smash through his own window, but maybe what he fought wasn’t there and he was just hallucinating. Or perhaps what he saw really was there and simply vanished after its death, or maybe his medication affects his ability to perceive things from other planes. I leave that open to interpretation.

Bronzite, D. (n.d.). The Hero’s Journey – Mythic Structure of Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth. Retrieved from http://www.movieoutline.com/articles/the-hero-journey-mythic-structure-of-joseph-campbell-monomyth.html

Lemire, J. (2016). Moon Knight Vol. 1: Lunatic. New York, NY: Marvel Entertainment.

Lovecraft, H. P. (1919). Dagon.

Ellis, W. (2014). Moon Knight Vol. 7. New York, NY: Marvel Entertainment.

 

 

 

 

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